Solution for: Giving the presentation

Answer Table

1. B 6. C
2. C 7. C
3. C 8. B
4. A 9. C
5. A 10. A

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Exam Review

Giving the presentation

Hi, Martin.

Hi, Kate. How are you?

Fine. I'm relieved to have done my presentation!

I'm sure! How did it go?

Kate: Oh, OK in the end, but I was ever so nervous beforehand. It's silly, because I do know my stuff quite well. I must know those statistics (C) inside out, but when you have to get each table of results to come up in the right order, it can make you nervous. It was my first time using the computerised projector, and I was sure I was going to get the controls wrong (B), or something. And of course, that's not a good situation, if you know you've got to listen to questions carefully, and be ready to answer quickly (A).

Look at Question 1. The question consists of two parts: 'Before giving her presentation' and 'Kate was worried about'. This is what you must listen for.

These are some dangers in choosing an answer:

  • You hear Kate say what worried her during or after the presentation, not before her presentation, and choose the wrong answer.
  • You hear Kate say what she was looking forward to, not what she was worried about before the presentation, and choose the wrong answer.
  • You hear another speaker, not Kate, say what he or she was worried about before his or her presentation, and choose the wrong answer.

Option A

1    Did Kate expect to be asked questions? Yes

2    Does she talk about questions being difficult? No. She says, 'you've got to listen to questions carefully, and be ready to answer quickly'.

3    Is option A the correct answer? No.

Option B

1    Does she talk about using projection equipment? Yes

2    Does she talk about problems in connection with projection equipment?  --> Yes. She says, 'It was my first time using the computerised projector, and I was sure I was going to get the controls wrong, or something. And of course, that's not a good situation ...'. This information links to what she said before: 'I was ever so nervous beforehand'. It also explains what she means when she says, 'when you have to get each table of results to come up in the right order, it can make you nervous'.

3    Is option B the correct answer? Yes

Option C

1    Does she talk about statistical results? Yes

2    Does she say that explaining statistical results was something she was worried about? No. She says, 'I must know those statistics inside out'.

3    Is option C the correct answer? No

Martin: But it was fine once you got going?

Kate: Yes.

Martin: I do feel that the standard of presentations could be improved in general. I think a lot of the lecturers agree with me, although I don't honestly know what they can be expected to do about it. Students need to appreciate the difference between style and content. Too many presentations are just a mass of detailed content - all very worthy - without any attempt to engage people's interest. Basic things, like looking at your audience's faces, seem to get forgotten. And that makes it harder to concentrate on the points made about the research itself. 

Note:  Martin outlines that he has a negative view of the presentations: 'the standard of presentations could be improved'. Option A is not the answer; in fact, the discussion of research is too detailed. Option B is not the answer; Martin appears to sympathise with the lecturers ('although I don't honestly know what they can be expected to do about it'). Option C is the correct answer; students don't make 'any attempt to engage people's interest' by 'looking at your audience's faces'.

Kate: Yes, there are quite a few improvements I'd like to see. Take tutorials, for example. I feel they're often a missed opportunity. I come out not feeling sure about what I've learnt. Week in week out, I faithfully plough through the reading list, which is fair enough, but then the discussion doesn't seem to extract the main issues. It's frustrating.

NoteKate shows that she has a negative view of tutorials: 'they're often a missed opportunity'. Option A is not the answer; 'the reading list... is fair enough'. Option B is not the answer; we are simply told that tutorials happen every week. Option C is the correct answer; if 'the discussion doesn't seem to extract the main issues', then there isn't a clear focus.

Martin: Hmm, I know what you mean. Mind you, we have to take some responsibility ourselves. I actually got quite a lot from that skills workshop I went to on taking notes, and I'd like to make similar improvements in the next semester. The reading list we get has several websites each time, and I want to learn to navigate mv way round them more effectively.

Note: We are told Martin wants to 'make ... improvements' next semester. Option B is not the answer; he's already done that. Option C is not the answer; Martin talks about his reading lists, but he doesn’t mention prioritising them.

Option A is the correct answer: he says he wants 'to learn to navigate my way round them (websites on the internet] more effectively'.

Kate: That's sounds a good idea. Mind you, it means spending more time in the library ...

Martin: If you can get in ...

Kate: You mean because it's too crowded? It isn't big enough, is it?

Martin: Well, I don't know. I mean. I like to work late in the evening, and it shuts before I want to finish. But I know you can access the catalogue from a laptop.

Kate: Which personally I haven't got. Actually, the problem for me is that I like to get up early and start work straight awav. and they don’t start until 9 .I wish they'd change that.

Note: Martin and Kate both have problems with the library; the question requires you to identify the problem they both describe. Option B is not the answer; Kate raises this point, but Martin says 'I don't know'. Option C is not the answer; Martin mentions the catalogue, but doesn't say it is difficult to use. Option A is the correct answer: the library closes too soon for Martin and opens too late for Kate - they both want it to be open for longer.

Look, we ought to start working out what to do next for our project.

Kate:    Yes, enough moaning!

Martin: OK, the main thing is to allocate the various tasks between us, isn't it?

Kate:    Yes. Well, we're going to need the Questionnaire before we can do much else, aren't we? Do you want to handle that?

Martin:    I'd assumed we'd do it together?

Kate:    You have more experience than me. Maybe you could think up the main questions, you know, a first version of the whole thing, and then I could read it through.

Martin: And make suggestions? Well. OK. My experience on projects has all been with closed groups.

Note: Kate first suggests that Martin 'handles' the questionnaire. If you choose option A (Martin) at this point, you are answering the question too soon. At this point, it has not been confirmed who will do the task of composing the questionnaire.

Next, Martin suggests that they do the task together. This indicates that both Martin and Kate (option C) is the answer. However, you cannot be sure, because Kate has not agreed to this yet.

Then Kate accepts Martin's suggestion and clarifies how they will both do the task. But you still cannot be sure, because Martin has not agreed to this.

Finally, Martin confirms his agreement ('Well, OK.'), and you can now safely choose option C as the correct answer.

 I don't really know how you go about selecting subjects from larger populations.

Kate:    Actually, it’s quite straightforward. You use tables of randomised numbers.

Martin:    Could you show me?

Kate:    Yeah. I'll take you through the process. That way, you'll learn, and I'll feel surer for having someone else there.

Note: Both Martin and Kate will select people to interview ('selecting subjects from larger populations'). Although it is clear that Kate knows more about 'the process', this doesn't mean she will do it alone.

Now, that brings us to the interviews themselves.

Martin:    Right. Would you like to do them? Or are there too many?

Kate:    Well, your typing’s pretty fast, isn't it? So, if you agree to handle the transcribing afterwards. I'm prepared to do the face-to-face stage. Does that sound fair?

Martin: It does to me. But tell me if you find it takes longer than you thought.

Note: This is only Kate. Martin isn't going to conduct interviews; he is going to type them up after Kate has done the 'face-to-face stage'. 

Kate:    And vice versa! And when we get the results altogether, they'll need to be run through statistics programmes, won't they? That's where I always feel a bit unsure about which tests are the correct ones to choose.

Martin: Same here. But we can get advice from the lecturers about that. Shall we do all that as a joint effort?

Kate:    I think it'd make us feel more secure about what we were doing.

Note: Martin and Kate will analyse the statistics - 'run (the results) through statistics programmes' - 'as a joint effort'.

Martin: Yes, it would be terrible to get that wrong after all the hard work leading up to it.

Kate:    And then we've got to present the whole thing to the group. Will you feel up to doing that?

Martin:    I think we should do a joint presentation. It's all both our work, after all.

Kate:    I guess you're right. But would you mind getting the slides and so on ready? I find that takes me ages, and still doesn't look any good.

Martin: Whereas I quite enjoy that kind of thing. OK. Now, we need to think about... 

Note: It's important here to distinguish between giving the presentation (which the question does not ask about) and preparing visuals for the presentation (which the question does ask about). Martin and Kate will give the presentation together ('a joint presentation'), but only Martin will make 'the slides and so on'

Questions 1-5

Choose the correct letter, A, B or C.

1    Before giving her presentation, Kate was worried about 

A being asked difficult questions.

B using the projection equipment.

C explaining statistical results.
Answer: B    Locate  Listen from here

2    During many presentations by students, Martin feels that

A the discussion of research methods is not detailed enough.

B lecturers do not show enough interest in their students' work.

C the student does not make enough eye contact with the audience.
Answer: C    Locate  Listen from here

3    What is Kate’s opinion of the tutorials she attends?

A They involve too much preparation.

B They should be held more frequently.

C They do not have a clear focus.
Answer: C    Locate  Listen from here

4    What does Martin intend to do next semester?

A make better use of the internet

B improve his note-taking skills

C prioritise reading lists effectively
Answer: A    Locate  Listen from here

5    What problem do Kate and Martin both have when using the library? 

A The opening hours are too short.

B   There are too few desks to work at.

C   The catalogue is difficult to use.
Answer: A    Locate  Listen from here

 ------------------

Tip: Multiple-choice with single answer

Task guide

►    This task requires you to choose the correct answer to each question from three possible answers.

►    There may be between one and ten questions.

►    The questions follow the order of the recording.

►    Within each question, you may hear reference to the three options in any order.

►    If you realise you have missed a question, don’t try to remember it, but move on, and make sure you do not miss the next question(s).

►    Multiple-choice questions vary considerably in terms of complexity. In Section 1, they ask you to listen for relatively straightforward facts, but in Section 3 and Section 4, the questions will test your understanding of opinions, feelings, evidence, argument, and so on.

►    Do not immediately choose an option simply because you hear the same word or words on the recording. It is your understanding of the meaning of the whole question that is tested here.

 

Step-by-step guide

►    Step 1 - Think first

It is very important that you read the question carefully.

The stems of some questions (here Questions 1 and 2) are partial sentences, to be completed by the possible answers, while the stems of others are complete questions (here Questions 3, 4 and 5)

►    Step 2 - Watch out for possible dangers

Look at Question 1. The question consists of two parts: 'Before giving her presentation' and 'Kate was worried about'. This is what you must listen for.

These are some dangers in choosing an answer:

  • You hear Kate say what worried her during or after the presentation, not before her presentation, and choose the wrong answer.
  • You hear Kate say what she was looking forward to, not what she was worried about before the presentation, and choose the wrong answer.
  • You hear another speaker, not Kate, say what he or she was worried about before his or her presentation, and choose the wrong answer.

   Step 3 - Consider the possibilities

Look at the tapescript for Question 1 and answer the questions below about options A, B and C.

Tapescript

I was ever so nervous beforehand. It's silly, because I do know my stuff quite well. I must know those statistics inside out, but when you have to get each table of results to come up in the right order, it can make you nervous. It was my first time using the computerised projector, and I was sure I was going to get the controls wrong, or something. And of course, that's not a good situation, if you know you've got to listen to questions carefully and be ready to answer quickly.

Option A

1    Did Kate expect to be asked questions?............

2    Does she talk about questions being difficult? ........

3    Is option A the correct answer?............

Option B

1    Does she talk about using projection equipment?

2    Does she talk about problems in connection with projection equipment?............

3    Is option B the correct answer?............

Option C

1    Does she talk about statistical results?............

2    Does she say that explaining statistical results was something she was worried about?............

3    Is option C the correct answer?............

Step 4 - Listen and do the task

 

Questions 6-10

Who will do the following tasks?

A Martin

B Kate

C both Martin and Kate

Write the correct letter, A, B or C next to questions 6-10.

6     compose questionnaire    
Answer: C    Locate  Listen from here

7    select people to interview   
Answer: C    Locate  Listen from here

8    conduct interviews   
Answer: B    Locate  Listen from here

9    analyse statistics    
Answer: C    Locate  Listen from here

10    prepare visuals for presentation   
Answer: A    Locate  Listen from here

----------------------

Tips: Classification

Task guide

►    This task requires you to answer a series of questions with the same choice of answers in each case.

►    Although the possible answers are the same for each question, the questions do not depend on each other. You can get one question wrong, but the next one right.

►    Do not try to 'break the code': it is not possible to predict how many answers will be the same, or to find a pattern of any kind.

►    In some cases, option C may be the combination of options A and B. In other cases, the possible answers may consist of three distinct possibilities - three different people, places, periods of time, and so on.

►    The questions follow the order of the recording.

►    If you miss one question, leave it and go on to the next one.

 

Step-by-step guide

►    Step 1 - Think first

What you hear on the recording may be different words from the questions, but with the same meaning.

For 'compose a questionnaire' in Question 6, you might hear 'write a questionnaire', 'create a questionnaire', 'produce questions for a questionnaire', 'put a questionnaire together', and so on.

Look at Questions 7-10. Think of what you might hear on the tape and write your ideas:

7 ..........................................................................................

8 ..........................................................................................

9 ..........................................................................................

10 ..........................................................................................

►    Step 2 - Check what you will hear

Look at the tapescript for Question 6.

Tapescript

Kate: Yes. Well, we're going to need the questionnaire before we can do much else, aren't we? Do you want to handle that?

Martin: I'd assumed we'd do it together?

Kate: You have more experience than me. Maybe you could think up the main questions, you know, a first version of the whole thing, and then I could read it through.

Martin: And make suggestions? Well, OK.

Kate first suggests that Martin 'handles' the questionnaire. If you choose option A (Martin) at this point, you are answering the question too soon. At this point, it has not been confirmed who will do the task of composing the questionnaire.

Next, Martin suggests that they do the task together. This indicates that both Martin and Kate (option C) is the answer. However, you cannot be sure, because Kate has not agreed to this yet.

Then Kate accepts Martin's suggestion and clarifies how they will both do the task. But you still cannot be sure, because Martin has not agreed to this.

Finally, Martin confirms his agreement ('Well, OK.'), and you can now safely choose option C as the correct answer.

►    Step 3 - Listen and do the task

 

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